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C. Creating an Outline

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Creating an Outline for an Essay
How to Write a Compare and Contrast Essay Outline: A Point-By-Point Organization

What are the main ideas? Your thesis statement will have two parts. The first part states the topic, and the second part states the point of the essay. The body of your essay argues, explains or describes your topic. Each main idea that you wrote in your diagram or outline will become a separate section within the body of your essay.

Each body paragraph will have the same basic structure. Begin by writing one of your main ideas as the introductory sentence. Next, write each of your supporting ideas in sentence format, but leave three or four lines in between each point to come back and give detailed examples to back up your position.

Fill in these spaces with relative information that will help link smaller ideas together. Now that you have developed your thesis and the overall body of your essay, you must write an introduction.

Begin with an attention grabber. You can use shocking information, dialogue, a story, a quote, or a simple summary of your topic. Whichever angle you choose, make sure that it ties in with your thesis statement, which will be included as the last sentence of your introduction. The conclusion brings closure of the topic and sums up your overall ideas while providing a final perspective on your topic.

Your conclusion should consist of three to five strong sentences. Simply review your main points and provide reinforcement of your thesis. After writing your conclusion, you might think that you have completed your essay. Before you consider this a finished work, you must pay attention to all the small details. Check the order of your paragraphs. Your strongest points should be the first and last paragraphs within the body, with the others falling in the middle.

Also, make sure that your paragraph order makes sense. If your essay is describing a process, such as how to make a great chocolate cake, make sure that your paragraphs fall in the correct order.

Review the instructions for your essay, if applicable. Jot down your ideas, important bits of research, and any questions you might want answered. For a creative project, you might write down scene ideas or plot points.

Write down everything you might include in your outline. You can always eliminate ideas later! Here are some ways to organize your thoughts: Create a mind map. Write your thoughts on index cards. Develop a thesis or controlling idea for your outline.

In most cases, this will be the thesis you use to complete the final product, such as an essay. For example, you may be writing a paper about policy change. Write an alphanumeric outline for the easy approach. Although you might not recognize the name, most outlines follow the alphanumeric format. Each level of your outline will be organized using a letter or number. Make a decimal outline to highlight the relationship between ideas. A decimal outline looks very similar to an alphanumeric outline.

However, a decimal outline only uses numbers, and each sublevel is set off with decimals. This allows you to illustrate that each sublevel is a part of a larger argument. Decide if you want to write full sentences or short phrases. Most outlines include short phrases, which are also called topic outlines. However, using full sentences can help you better understand your ideas. You might use full sentences to make it easier to write a final paper, to make a good study guide, or to fulfill the requirements of an assignment.

Group your ideas together. Review your brainstorming, placing related ideas in the same group. You can always eliminate ideas you realize are unnecessary. These groups will become main points, so narrow your groups down until you have your desired number of main points. For an essay or speech, that often means 3, but a creative piece may have more. Sort your index cards, if you used them to brainstorm. Put cards with related ideas together. For example, you can put them in stacks, or you can line your cards out in rows to make them easier to read.

Put each group in order from broad ideas to specific details. Broad ideas are more likely to be your main points, while details are the bits of information you will use to support those ideas. Depending on the purpose of your outline, you may have many subpoints and supporting details. However, aim to have at least subpoints and supporting details for each main idea. Your subpoints might be that Victor Frankenstein is restored by nature and that his scientific efforts create a monster.

As supporting details, you might include quotes from the book. If you're writing a story or presenting a historical argument, a chronological order makes sense. For an essay or speech, pick the subtopic with the most supporting materials, and lead with this argument. From there, order your major subtopics so each one naturally flows into the next. Outline your introduction as the first main point for a speech or essay. You can use either phrases or full sentences, depending on which you chose to use.

Some people prefer to write out their introduction, which is also okay. Here are the points you need in your introduction: The outline headings are your main points. These ideas should be drawn directly from your thesis or controlling idea. Frankenstein champions emotion over reason Full sentence outline: In Frankenstein , Mary Shelley champions the use of emotion over reason.

Write at least 2 subpoints for each main idea. These are the ideas that further explain your main point. In an essay, they might be your reasons for making your argument. In a creative work, they might be parts of your plot point.

For example, a novel may have many subpoints. Similarly, a study guide will likely have several subpoints, as well. Add at least 2 supporting details for each subpoint. They might include direct quotes, statistics, facts, or examples. For a creative work, you might include essential details you must include in that scene, such as an internal conflict in your main character.

Similar to subpoints, you may have more supporting details, depending on your purpose. A novel or study guide will likely have more supporting details. Include more layers of your outline, if necessary. Most basic outlines will include 3 layers, but you may need more. If this is the case, you can continue creating sublevels using the formatting structure you chose, either alphanumeric or decimal.

For example, you might need more layers to provide more details. In the Frankenstein example above, you might include a 4th layer to write out your commentary about the quotes you used to support your point. Your subpoints might include the following: Write a concluding statement. Your outline should relate back to your thesis or main idea, address the purpose you set out to achieve and reflect your audience.

Revise your outline if ideas are missing or not fleshed out. In some cases, you may need to add more information, such as additional supporting details. The revision process allows you to do that.

You might also want to rewrite sentences or phrases to make your ideas clearer. Academic level Undergraduate Bachelor Professional. Deadline 6 hours 3 hours 12 hours 24 hours 2 days 3 days 6 days 10 days 14 days. So, what is a compare and contrast essay? Here, all you need to know is that these types of essays look into two subjects. These items might either be vastly different or closely related.

It concentrates on what makes two things similar or different or various combinations of differences and similarities. Of course, if it were just about making simple comparisons then it would be too natural right? A good compare and contrast essay should: A Point-By-Point Organization By point-by-point, we merely mean a comparison that concentrates on comparing and contrasting one factor in both subjects, and all at the same time!

The introduction The main body — Here, you should include all the differences in the two subjects Conclusion The Presentation of Your Compare and Contrast Essay Outline This is the part where you present your topic in broad and specific terms. A compare and contrast essay outline example such as comparing and contrasting two dogs, Molly and Morgan may sound something similar to this: Proceeding on from our Molly and Morgan example, the next sentences would probably sound like this: Regardless of the turnaround time or field of study, you can be sure we have qualified personnel to handle the assignment for you.

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Why Is It Essential To Have An Organized And Clear Outline For Your Compare And Contrast Essay?

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An essay outline can even help you determine the length of each paragraph. Especially in cases where you are limited to a number of pages or assigned a word count, you can use an essay outline to break the structure into percentages or words. Writing an essay outline can be as easy as you want to make it.

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Sample Essay Outlines Why Write an Outline? An outline will help you organize your main ideas and determine the order in which you are going to write about them. Writing an outline is a very effective way to think through how you will organize and present the information in your essay.

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Putting together an argumentative essay outline is the perfect way to turn your blank document into a ready-to-use template. All you have to do is fill in the blanks! In this blog post, I’m going to share with you how to create an argumentative essay outline. A compare and contrast essay outline example such as comparing and contrasting two dogs, Molly and Morgan may sound something similar to this: “ Do opposite poles attract? Well, the principle of attraction states that they do.

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Creating an Outline for an Essay Most analytical, interpretive, or persuasive essays tend to follow the same basic pattern. This page should help you formulate effective . C. Creating an Outline. SUMMARY: Construct an argument that answers the writing prompt by arranging your notes linearly. Unless your teacher wants a 5 paragraph essay (an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph), don’t feel constrained by that model.