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macroeconomics

What is 'Macroeconomics'

❶Accordingly, this unit and those that follow will uncover scenarios and philosophical debates about the role of government in a market-based economy and whether the GDP is an accurate measure of societal well-being, quality of life, and the standard of living. Keynes' theory explained why markets may not clear.

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BREAKING DOWN 'Microeconomics'
microeconomist
macroeconomic

Output can be measured as total income, or it can be viewed from the production side and measured as the total value of final goods and services or the sum of all value added in the economy. Macroeconomic output is usually measured by gross domestic product GDP or one of the other national accounts.

Economists interested in long-run increases in output study economic growth. Advances in technology, accumulation of machinery and other capital , and better education and human capital are all factors that lead to increased economic output over time. However, output does not always increase consistently over time. Business cycles can cause short-term drops in output called recessions.

Economists look for macroeconomic policies that prevent economies from slipping into recessions and that lead to faster long-term growth. The amount of unemployment in an economy is measured by the unemployment rate, i. The unemployment rate in the labor force only includes workers actively looking for jobs. People who are retired, pursuing education, or discouraged from seeking work by a lack of job prospects are excluded. Unemployment can be generally broken down into several types that are related to different causes.

A general price increase across the entire economy is called inflation. When prices decrease, there is deflation. Economists measure these changes in prices with price indexes. Inflation can occur when an economy becomes overheated and grows too quickly.

Similarly, a declining economy can lead to deflation. Central bankers , who manage a country's money supply, try to avoid changes in price level by using monetary policy. Raising interest rates or reducing the supply of money in an economy will reduce inflation. Inflation can lead to increased uncertainty and other negative consequences.

Deflation can lower economic output. Central bankers try to stabilize prices to protect economies from the negative consequences of price changes. Changes in price level may be the result of several factors. The quantity theory of money holds that changes in price level are directly related to changes in the money supply. Most economists believe that this relationship explains long-run changes in the price level.

For example, a decrease in demand due to a recession can lead to lower price levels and deflation. A negative supply shock, such as an oil crisis, lowers aggregate supply and can cause inflation. The AD-AS model has become the standard textbook model for explaining the macroeconomy.

The aggregate demand curve's downward slope means that more output is demanded at lower price levels. In the conventional Keynesian use of the AS-AD model, the aggregate supply curve is horizontal at low levels of output and becomes inelastic near the point of potential output , which corresponds with full employment.

The AD—AS diagram can model a variety of macroeconomic phenomena, including inflation. Changes in the non-price level factors or determinants cause changes in aggregate demand and shifts of the entire aggregate demand AD curve.

When demand for goods exceeds supply there is an inflationary gap where demand-pull inflation occurs and the AD curve shifts upward to a higher price level. When the economy faces higher costs, cost-push inflation occurs and the AS curve shifts upward to higher price levels.

The IS—LM model represents all the combinations of interest rates and output that ensure the equilibrium in the goods and money markets. The IS curve is downward sloping because output and interest rate have an inverse relationship in the goods market: The neoclassical growth model of Robert Solow has become a common textbook model for explaining economic growth in the long-run.

The Solow model assumes that labor and capital are used at constant rates without the fluctuations in unemployment and capital utilization commonly seen in business cycles. An increase in output, or economic growth, can only occur because of an increase in the capital stock, a larger population, or technological advancements that lead to higher productivity total factor productivity.

An increase in the savings rate leads to a temporary increase as the economy creates more capital, which adds to output. However, eventually the depreciation rate will limit the expansion of capital: Solow's model suggests that economic growth in terms of output per capita depends solely on technological advances that enhance productivity.

In the s and s endogenous growth theory arose to challenge neoclassical growth theory. This group of models explains economic growth through other factors, such as increasing returns to scale for capital and learning-by-doing , that are endogenously determined instead of the exogenous technological improvement used to explain growth in Solow's model.

Macroeconomic policy is usually implemented through two sets of tools: Both forms of policy are used to stabilize the economy , which can mean boosting the economy to the level of GDP consistent with full employment. Central banks implement monetary policy by controlling the money supply through several mechanisms. Typically, central banks take action by issuing money to buy bonds or other assets , which boosts the supply of money and lowers interest rates, or, in the case of contractionary monetary policy, banks sell bonds and take money out of circulation.

Usually policy is not implemented by directly targeting the supply of money. Central banks continuously shift the money supply to maintain a targeted fixed interest rate. Some of them allow the interest rate to fluctuate and focus on targeting inflation rates instead. Central banks generally try to achieve high output without letting loose monetary policy that create large amounts of inflation. Conventional monetary policy can be ineffective in situations such as a liquidity trap.

When interest rates and inflation are near zero, the central bank cannot loosen monetary policy through conventional means. Central banks can use unconventional monetary policy such as quantitative easing to help increase output. Instead of buying government bonds, central banks can implement quantitative easing by buying not only government bonds, but also other assets such as corporate bonds, stocks, and other securities. This allows lower interest rates for a broader class of assets beyond government bonds.

In another example of unconventional monetary policy, the United States Federal Reserve recently made an attempt at such a policy with Operation Twist.

Unable to lower current interest rates, the Federal Reserve lowered long-term interest rates by buying long-term bonds and selling short-term bonds to create a flat yield curve. Fiscal policy is the use of government's revenue and expenditure as instruments to influence the economy. Examples of such tools are expenditure , taxes , debt. For example, if the economy is producing less than potential output, government spending can be used to employ idle resources and boost output.

Government spending does not have to make up for the entire output gap. There is a multiplier effect that boosts the impact of government spending. For instance, when the government pays for a bridge, the project not only adds the value of the bridge to output, but also allows the bridge workers to increase their consumption and investment, which helps to close the output gap.

The effects of fiscal policy can be limited by crowding out. When the government takes on spending projects, it limits the amount of resources available for the private sector to use. Crowding out occurs when government spending simply replaces private sector output instead of adding additional output to the economy.

Crowding out also occurs when government spending raises interest rates, which limits investment. Defenders of fiscal stimulus argue that crowding out is not a concern when the economy is depressed, plenty of resources are left idle, and interest rates are low.

Fiscal policy can be implemented through automatic stabilizers. Automatic stabilizers do not suffer from the policy lags of discretionary fiscal policy. Automatic stabilizers use conventional fiscal mechanisms but take effect as soon as the economy takes a downturn: Economists usually favor monetary over fiscal policy because it has two major advantages.

First, monetary policy is generally implemented by independent central banks instead of the political institutions that control fiscal policy. Independent central banks are less likely to make decisions based on political motives. Central banks can quickly make and implement decisions while discretionary fiscal policy may take time to pass and even longer to carry out.

Macroeconomics descended from the once divided fields of business cycle theory and monetary theory. It took many forms, including the version based on the work of Irving Fisher:. In the typical view of the quantity theory, money velocity V and the quantity of goods produced Q would be constant, so any increase in money supply M would lead to a direct increase in price level P.

The quantity theory of money was a central part of the classical theory of the economy that prevailed in the early twentieth century. This theory evolved throughout the 20th century, diverting into several macroeconomic schools of thought known as Keynesian economics, often referred to as Keynesian theory or Keynesianism.

Factors studied in both microeconomics and macroeconomics typically have an influence on one another. For example, the unemployment level in the economy as a whole has an effect on the supply of workers from which a company can hire.

Macroeconomics, in its most basic sense, is the branch of economics that deals with the structure, performance, behavior and decision-making of the whole, or aggregate, economy, instead of focusing on individual markets. Meanwhile, microeconomics looks at economic tendencies, or what can happen when individuals make certain choices. Individuals are typically broken down into subgroups, such as buyers, sellers and business owners.

These actors interact with the supply and demand for resources, using money and interest rates as a pricing mechanism for coordination. Aggregate demand is the total amount of goods and services demanded From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.

The economy is the production and consumption activities that determine how scarce resources are allocated in an area. Learn about this famous British economist's proposed solution to a widespread economic problem. Microeconomics is the study of how individuals and businesses make decisions to maximize satisfaction.

To illustrate, we use the example of renting a New York City apartment. Economics is divided into two broad categories: Find out what the difference is between them and where they overlap.

Differentiating between microeconomics and macroeconomics is primarily concerned with the difference of the scales of the Microeconomics is the study of individuals and business decisions, while macroeconomics looks at higher up country and government Dive into the world of economics by learning the key differences between macroeconomics and finance.

These ideas help investors Read about the purpose, derivations and uses of microeconomics, and see how the interaction of scarcity and choice drives

Financial Definition of MACROECONOMICS

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A Glossary of Macroeconomics Terms The Accelerator -- A parameter that defines the relationship between national income and required capital stock. An Asset -- Anything of value owned by an individual, institution or economic agent.

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(G) Expenditures by government for goods and services tat government consumes in providing public goods and services that government consumes in providing public goods and for public (social) capital that has a long lifetime; the expenditures of all governments in .

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the branch of economics that studies the overall working of a national economy aggregate output The total quantity of goods and services produced in an economy in a given period. This is the simplest yardstick of economic performance. If one person, firm or country can produce more of something with the same amount of effort and resources, they have an absolute advantage.

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There are two sides to the study of economics: macroeconomics and microeconomics. As the term implies, macroeconomics looks at the overall, big picture scenario of the economy. Put simply, it focuses on the way the economy performs as a whole. Macroeconomics definition is - a study of economics in terms of whole systems especially with reference to general levels of output and income and to the interrelations among sectors of the economy.